Monthly Archives: November 2016

Fisherman’s soup

Goulash

Halászlé
Fisherman’s soup

This halászlé, the soup of the fishermen of the Donau and the Tisza, may fall into the category “soup”, but could equally be called a carp goulash. It is world-famous in the whole of Hungary and in all the neighbouring countries, and a bit notorious, too, for this soup is meant to be spicy, and with spice we mean really spicy. Probably because it can be mighty cold on the water, in winter time.

“Ponty”, carp, that is the main ingredient. Carp is the most eaten fish in Hungary, and you don’t have to buy a fish that has been staying at the fishmonger’s for so long that it couldn’t possibly recollect what water felt like. In Hungary, carp can be bought alive and kicking at practically every (super)market.

As with all traditional recipes, there are almost as many variations as there are cooks. This is a basic recipe for halaszle, simpel, as all things perfect are simple.

Halaszlé

for this Hungarian fish soup we need:
1 carp
3 onions
2 – 3 dried hot peppers
2 tbsp. sweet paprika
water

Clean the carp, or let the fishmonger do it for you. Cut off the head and the tail and wash them with cold water.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Chop the onions and add them to the boiling water, together with the head and tail of the carp and the peppers. Let it boil for 1 hour. Don’t skim it: leave it as it is.

Meanwhile cut the fish in thick slices. Season with salt and set them apart.

After the halászlé has been cooking for an hour, stir in two generous spoonfuls of sweet paprika. Add the slices of carp and reduce the heat: the soup must only slightly simmer from now on. Don’t stir, for that may break the slices of fish, at the most go over the bottom of the pot carefully with a wooden spoon to make sure nothing sticks to it.

When the fish is done, the soup is ready to eat. That will take 20 – 30 minutes, depending on the size of the slices of carp. Don’t let it cook for too long if you don’t want it to fall apart in dry, tasteless lumps.

Put a slice of carp on a plate and spoon the soup over it. Serve with bread or broad noodles.

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©2016.apropos.info

Goulash of green beans

Goulash

Zöldbabgulyás
Goulash of green beans

When thinking of Hungarian goulash, the first thing that springs to mind is beef, but pork was -and is- the most eaten meat in Hungary, and not at all a stranger in the goulash cauldrons, as we can see for instance in the famed Jókai goulash or the maybe even more renowned Székelykáposzta. In this goulash, too, pork is used. Together with the green beans, potatoes, peppers and tomatoes this recipe will garantee a wholesome and very tasty meal.

Goulash of green beans

For this goulash of green beans and pork we need:
50 gr. (1.7 oz.) smoked bacon
1 onion
500 gr. (17.63 oz.) pork
1 tsp. hot paprika
salt
500 gr. grean beans
500 gr. potatoes
2 tomatoes
2 bell peppers
1 dl. (0.35 pt) yogurt
1 tbsp. flour
parsley

Cube the bacon and chop the onion. Sauté them together in a little oil until the onion is translucent. Meanwhile, cut the pork in not too small cubes. Increase the heat and add the pork. Sauté quickly until browned on all sides.

remove the pot from the fire and stir in the paprika. Quench with a glass of water and put it back on the stove. Cover with a lid and let it simmer for half an hour.

In the meantime, clean the green beans and peel the potatoes. Cut the beans in half and the potatoes in cubes. Cut the paprika in strips and the tomato to pieces. Add it all to the goulash, together with enough water to cover it barely. Bring to a boil and let it gently simmer until the meat is done.

Mix the yogurt with a spoonful of flour. Mix it into the goulash and let it cook for a few minutes more until it thickens.

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©2016.apropos.info

Lentil goulash

Goulash

Lencsegulyás
Lentil goulash

Nor the wet winds of the fall, nor the wintry cold can harm us after a plate of this wholesome and tasty goulash made of lentils, garlic, root vegetables and lightly salted and smoked pork. This goulash, which is equally nice to eat when the weather is not so unfriendly, is usually served with csipetke: small noodles that are cooked in the goulash the last few minutes.

For this goulash of lentils and pork we need:
5 – 6 cloves garlic
½ tsp. hot paprika
1 tbsp. flour
400 gr. lentils
salt
2 carrots
1 parsnip
¼ root celery
500 gr. smoked pork (from neck or shoulder)
csipetke
sour cream

Chop the cloves of garlic finely. Sauté in a litlle oil for a two minutes, be careful not to let them brown. Take the pan from the fire and stir in the paprika and the flour. mix weel and put aside.

Put the lentils in a pot , cover with water and bring to a boil. Skim off the foam and mix in the cold roux (the mixture of oil, garlic, flour and paprika). Season with salt and let simmer until the lentils are half done.

While the lentils are cooking, clean the root vegetables and slice them. Cut the celery and the pork in cubes. Add it all to the goulash. Let it quietly simmer on until the lentils and the vegetables are done.

Meanwhile, make the csipetke. Add them to the goulash when it is done and let it simmer for another ten minutes. Serve the lentil goulash with a generous spoonful of sour cream.

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©2016.apropos.info

Jókai bableves

Goulash

Jókai bableves
Jókai bean goulash

In the list of most Hungarian of all Hungarian dishes this Jókai bableves undoubtedly occupies a place of honour. This beautiful, thick soup of smoked pork and beans is named after Hungarian writer Mór Jókai (1825-1904). Not because he had anything to do with its creation, but simply because he loved to eat it. It is being told that Jókai, who loved staying at Lake Balaton, greatly enjoyed this goulashsoup, which is a specialty of the local restaurateurs.

Jókai bableves

The secret weapon in this goulash soup is the pork knuckle. Slowly cooking the meat results in a rich, flavoursome broth as a basis for this soup. In that broth the white beans, root vegetables and a debrecziner sausage are cooked to a thick, juicy soup, which is seasoned with garlic, bay leaves and -of course- paprika. In this recipe the soup is served with original Hungarian pasta, csipetke. eat it with some bread and a glass of white wine and you’ll be needing nothing else for the rest of the day.

For this Jókai bableves we need:
200 gr. (7 oz) dry beans
600 gr. (21 oz) smoked prok knuckle
150 gr. (5.29 oz) parsley root
150 gr. carrots
100 gr. debreceni kolbász (a pork sausage, seasoned with paprika and garlic and slightly smoked)
1 bay leaf
2 cloves garlic
salt
8 – 10 black peppercorns
4 – 5 tbsp. lard (or oil)
2 tbsp. flour
1 onion
2 tsp. hot paprika
2 tbsp. chopped parsley
2 dl. (0.35 pt) sour cream
csipetke

for serving:
1 green pepper
sour cream

Let the beans soak overnight in water.

The next day, put the pork knuckle in a large pot and cover it with water. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and let it very, very gently simmer until it starts getting tender. It will take an hour or two at least. Take your time.

Meanwhile, clean the vegetables and cube them. Slice the sausage and chop the garlic. Add it to the pork, together with the soaked beans, bay leaf and pepper corns. Bring to a boil again and let it simmer on for 1½ hours, until the beans are done, but still firm. Make sure there is enough water in the pot, so keep hot water at hand.

Make the dough for the csipetke.

Remove the pork knuckle from the pot when the beans are done. The meat shopuld be so tender by now that it practically falls off the bone. Remove the bones and cut the meat in pieces. Put them back in the goulash soup.

Chop the onion and sauté in lard (or oil) until translucent. Sprinkle with the flour. Let it cook for a few minutes, so the flour absorbs the fat and browns a litlle. Take it from the fire and sprinkle with paprika and chopped parsley. Stir and quench immediately with a glass of cold water. Stir it well and add it to the soup.

Mix the sour cream into the goulash soup and add the csipetke. Let it boil very gently for another 10 minutes. Meanwhile, cut a green pepper lengthwise, remove the seeds and cut it into thin strips.

Taste the soup on cream, salt and pepper. Put it in plates with a spoon of cream on it and the strips of pepper on it.

Jókai bableves

Serve this Hungarian bean soup with bread and a glass of half-dry white wine.

Jó étvágyat!

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©2016.apropos.info

Szeged chicken goulash

Goulash

Szegedi gulyáscsirke
Chicken goulash from Szeged

This stew of chicken and root vegetables is a real Hungarian goulash, which means that it is such a wet affair that non-Hungarians would call it a soup rather than a goulash.

Chicken soup, made with a whole chicken and fresh vegetables, is in the U.S. known as “Jewish penicillin” because, as every Jewish mama knows, chicken soup is a highly effective remedy for colds and the flu. This is not only the opinion of Jewish mamas. Years ago, a research team from the University of Nebraska has found that chicken soup -the real stuff made of a real chicken- helps to relieve the discomforts of sniffle, sore throat and cough. As to what exactly the active agents are in this wholesome combination of chicken, vegetables, spices and water, the researchers had no answer. But it works, and therefore this “Jewish penicillin” is the only really effective drug against the snotty nose.

We know, thanks to Nobel Prize winner Albert Szent-György that paprika is rich in vitamin C. We also know that the powder produced around the town of Szeged contains the highest amounts of vitamin C of all Hungarian powder. Now, just imagine, if we would turn this healthy chicken soup into a goulash by simply adding the beneficial paprika from Szeged, what an incredible source of health will come within our reach!

Chicken Goulash from Szeged! Let the winter come!

1 chicken
1 large onion
ground caraway
1 tbsp. mild paprika (or more, to taste)
½ tsp. hot paprika
2 cloves garlic
200 gr. carrots
100 gr. parsnip
100 gr. celeriac
1 kg. potatoes
salt

Divide the chicken into 8 parts or rather let your poulterer do it for you. Chop the onion and sauté in a little oil gently until translucent. Remove the pan from the heat and sprinkle it with a pinch of ground caraway firm and a large spoonful of paprika powder. Quench immediately with 2-3 liters of water. The amount depends of course on the size of the pan. Put the pan back on the cooker and bring to a boil. Grate the garlic over it. When the water boils, add the pieces of chicken. Season with salt, lower the heat and let it simmer for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile clean and slice the root vegetables. They can join the chicken now. Let it simmer very gently for another 20 minutes. Time enough to peel the potatoes and cut them into cubes. Add them to the goulash. Let it cook for another 20 minutes, until the potatoes are done and the chicken is tender. Add csipetke to the goulash and cook for a few minutes more.

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©2016.apropos.info